The Effects of Sodium Nitroprusside on Intracranial Pressure and Autoregulation

  • John Morris Turner
  • Donald Powell
  • Robert Myles Gibson
  • David Gordon McDowall

Abstract

Sodium nitroprusside is being widely used for the production of hypotension in neurosurgery. KEANEY et al (1) have shown in animal investigations that after both halothane and sodium nitroprusside-induced hypotension, autoregulation of cerebral blood flow is impaired. There appears to be a partial recovery of autoregulation 90 minutes after hypotension induced with sodium nitroprusside, but not at this time after halothane-induced hypotension.

Key words

Sodium nitroprusside intraventricular pressure neurosurgery post-operative care autoregulation 

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References

  1. 1.
    KEANEY, N.P., MCDOWALL, D.G., TURNER, J.M., LANE, J.R., OKUDA, Y., PICKERODT, V.W.A., CORONEOS, N.J.: Cerebral blood flow autoregulation, cerebrospinal fluid acid-base parameters and profound hypotension induced by sodium nitroprusside and deep halothane anaesthesia. In: Stroke (Proc. 6th Int. CBF Symp., Philadelphia, 1973). In press.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    JENNETT, W.B., BARKER, J., FITCH, W., MCDOWALL, D.G.: Effect of anaesthesia on intracranial pressure in patients with space-occupying lesions. Lancet, i, 61–64 (1969).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    LEECH, P., BARKER, J., FITCH, W.: Changes in intracranial pressure and systemic arterial pressure during the termination of anaesthesia. Brit. J. Anaesth. In press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Morris Turner
  • Donald Powell
  • Robert Myles Gibson
  • David Gordon McDowall

There are no affiliations available

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