Advertisement

Brain Tissue Pressure Gradients in Experimental Infarction Recorded by Multiple Wick-Type Transducers1

  • Cornells A. F. Tulleken
  • John Stirling Meyer
  • Erwin O. Ott
  • Jacob Abraham
  • Ronald F. Dodson

Abstract

The wick catheter, applied to brain tissue pressure measurements by BROCK (1), appears to be a reliable device to measure the regional brain tissue pressure, based on our experience of implantation of about 150 wicks in 55 experimental animals.

Key Words

Brain tissue pressure gradients cerebral embolization cerebral infrartion wick-type pressure transducers 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    BROCK, M., WINKELMüLLER, W., PöLL, W., MARKAKIS, E., DIETZ, H.: Measurements of brain tissue pressure. Lancet ii, 595–596 (1972).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    BROCK, M., BECK, J., MARKAKIS, E., DIETZ, H.: Intracranial pressure gradients associated with experimental cerebral embolism. Stroke 3, 123–130 (1972).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    O’BRIEN, M.D., WALTZ, A.G.: Intracranial pressure gradients caused by experimental cerebral ischemia and edema. Stroke 4, 694–698 (1973).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    DORSCH, N.W.C., SYMON, L.: Intracranial pressure changes in acute ischemic regions of the primate hemisphere. In: Brock, M. Dietz, H. (eds.): Intracranial Pressure, pp. 109–114. Berlin-Heidelberg-New York: Springer-Verlag 1972.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    HUDGINS, W.R., GARCIA, J.H.: Transorbital approach to the middle cerebral artery of the squirrel monkey. A technique for experimental cerebral infarction applicable to ultrastructural studies. Stroke 1, 107–111 (1970).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cornells A. F. Tulleken
  • John Stirling Meyer
  • Erwin O. Ott
  • Jacob Abraham
  • Ronald F. Dodson

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations