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Regional Differences in β-Adrenergic Effects on Local Cerebral Blood Flow and Adrenergic Innervation

  • J. Seylaz
  • P. Aubineau
  • L. Edvinsson
  • H. Mamo
  • K. C. Nielsen
  • C. Owman
  • R. Sercombe

Abstract

Although it is now well documented (6, 8) that pial as well as intracerebral vessels are amply supplied with sympathetic adrenergic nerves which, as shown for pial arteries, fulfill ultra-structural (5) as well as pharmacologic (7) criteria for a true vasomotor innervation, the role of these fibers in the regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) remains a subject of considerable controversy. One reason is the inability of some investigators to obtain measurable changes in CBF after administration of sympathomimetic compounds; when an alteration is observed, the compound is assumed to have acted indirectly through modifications of brain metabolism.

Keywords

Cerebral Blood Flow Local Blood Flow Adrenergic Nerve Local Cerebral Blood Flow Adrenergic Innervation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Seylaz
  • P. Aubineau
  • L. Edvinsson
  • H. Mamo
  • K. C. Nielsen
  • C. Owman
  • R. Sercombe

There are no affiliations available

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