Motor Learning and Training in Sport

  • W. Müller-Limmroth
  • L. Pickenhain
  • J. Wartenweiler
  • R. Margaria
  • H. Groh
  • O. Popescu
  • M. Belloiu
  • C. Belloiu
  • R. Ballreich
  • I. M. Portnov
  • E. Ulich
  • K. B. Start
  • K. Kohl
  • W. Volpert
  • K. Weltner
  • D. Ungerer

Abstract

No mention is made of the relationships between physical movement and the central nervous systemin the book “The ScientificView of Sport-Perspectives, Aspects, Issues”. It is nevertheless a fact that, if a movement is to proceed as desired, it is the nervous system which must ensure that no disturbing environmental forces modify the desired movement in a sense contrary to the will of its executant. In every movement, therefore, the plan and intention of the movement must coincide with its realisation. The muscles concerned must be co-ordinated to this end, agonists and antagonists must harmonise in effecting a useful and purposeful movement. This harmony is the essential factor of the co-ordination of movement. It involves the co-ordination of all processes that are released in the organism for the execution of a certain movement in its correct sequence. Exercise and training are the methods for developing the co-ordination of movement, in which stimulating and inhibiting processes play the principal part. The result of such training is skill, i. e. good co-ordination of the fine motor movements of parts of the motor system, and dexterity, i. e. the well balanced co-ordination of the whole motor system of an organism.

Keywords

Fatigue Respiration Assimilation Expense Neurol 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Bibliography

  1. Ajzerman, M.A., Gurfînkel, V.S. (ed.): Issledovanie processov upravlenija myseönoj aktivnosti (Study of the Regulating and Control Processes of Muscle Activity). Moskow 1970.Google Scholar
  2. Brooks, V.B., Stoney, S.D.: Motor mechanisms: The role of the pyramidal system in motor control. Ann. Rev. Physiol. 33, 337–392 (1971).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Burke, R.E., Levine, D.N., Zajac, F.E., Tsairis, P., Engel, W.K.: Mammalian motor units: Physiological-histochemical correlation in three types in cat gastrocnemius. Science 174, 709–712 (1971).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Eldred, E., Granit, R., Merton, P.A.: Supraspinal control of the muscle spindles and its significance. J. Physiol. (Lond.) 122, 498–523 (1953).Google Scholar
  5. Ernst, E., Straub, F.B. (ed.): Symposium on muscle. Symp. Biol. Hungar. 8 (1968).Google Scholar
  6. Granit, R.: Systems for control of movement. In: Premier Congr. Int. Sci. Neurol. I, 63–80, Bruxelles 1957.Google Scholar
  7. Gurfînkel, V.S., Koc, J. M., Sik, M.L.: Reguljacija pozy celoveka (The Regulation of Man’s Posture). Moskow 1965.Google Scholar
  8. Gutmann, E.: Open questions in the study of the „trophic“ function of the nerve cell. In: H.T. Wycis (ed.): Top. Probl. Psychiat. Neurol. 10, 54–61 (1970).Google Scholar
  9. Gutmann, E.: Schaffino, S., Hanzlikowa, V.: Mechanism of compensatory hypertrophy in skeletal muscle of the rat. Exp. Neurol. 31, 451–464 (1971).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Harrington, W. F.: A mechanochemical mechanism for muscle contraction. Proc. nat. Acad. Sci. (Wash.) 68, 685–689 (1971).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Hasselbach, W.: Muskel. In: Gauer, Kramer, Jung (ed.): Physiologie des Menschen, Vol. 4. München 1971.Google Scholar
  12. Huth, L. (ed.): „Trophic“effects of vertebrate neurons. Neurosci. Res. Progr. Bull. 7, No. 1 (1968).Google Scholar
  13. Huth, L. (ed.), Yellin, H.: The dynamic nature of the socalled „fiber types“ of mammalian skeletal muscle. Exp. Neurol. 31, 277–300 (1971).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Huxley, A. F.: The activation of striated muscle and its mechanical response. Proc. roy. Soc. B. 178, 1–27 (1971).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Huxley, H. E.: The mechanism of muscular contraction. Science 164, 1356–1365 (1969).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Mommaerts, W. F. H. M.: Energetics of muscular contraction. Physiol. Rev. 49, 427–508 (1969).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. Mommaerts, W. F. H. M.: Excitation and response in muscular tissues. Ann. N.Y.Acad. Sci. 185, 425–432 (1971).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Paerisch, M.: Aufbau, Eigenschaften und Übertragungsverhalten der Glieder des spinalmotorischen Regelsystems. Wiss. Z. DHfK 10, H. 3/4, 5–40 (1968).Google Scholar
  19. Sandow, A.: Skeletal muscle. Ann. Rev. Physiol. 32, 87–138 (1970).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Salmons, S., Vrbová, G.: The influence of activity on some contractile characteristics of mammalian fast and slow muscles. J. Physiol. (Lond.) 201, 535–549 (1969).Google Scholar
  21. Spreng, M.: Regelkreise in der Physiologie und ihre Bedeutung für die menschliche Arbeit. Naturwiss. Rundschau 22, 62–68 (1969).Google Scholar
  22. Zimkin, N.N., et al. (ed.): Fiziologija myšečnoj dejatel’nosti, truda i sporta (Physiology of the Motor System; Work and Sport Physiology). Leningrad 1969.Google Scholar
  23. Astrand, P.O., Rodahl, K.: Textbook of Work Physiology. New York 1970.Google Scholar
  24. Bergius, R.: Übungsübertragung und Problemlösen. In: R. Bergius (ed.): Lernen und Denken. Handbuch der Psychologie, Vol. I, 2. Göttingen 1964.Google Scholar
  25. Bergius, R.: Psychologie des Lernens. München 1971.Google Scholar
  26. Cratty, B.J.: Movement Behavior and Motor Learning. Philadelphia 1967.Google Scholar
  27. Daugs, R.: Zum strukturellen Aufbau sensomotorischer Fertigkeiten. In: K. Koch, J. Recla, D. Ungerer (ed.): Neue Beiträge zur Methodik der Leibesübungen. Schorndorf 1972.Google Scholar
  28. Daugs, R.: Bewegungsstruktur und sensomotorischer Lernprozeß. In: K. Koch (ed.): Lernen, Üben, Trainieren. Schorndorf 1972.Google Scholar
  29. Geßmann, R., Quanz, D.R.: Sollwertverständnis und Curriculumansatz in der Sensomotorik. In: Sportwissenschaft 3, 154–174 (1973).Google Scholar
  30. Göhner, U.: Soll- und Ist-Wert nicht im Einklang (Zu Dieter Ungerer, Zur Theorie des sensomotorischen Lernens). In: Sportwissenschaft 2, 90–98 (1972).Google Scholar
  31. Hacker, W.: Kognitive Organisation der Bewegungsregulation — Studie zu Voraussetzungen und methodischen Konsequenzen. Probi. Ergeb. Psychol. 33, 45–77 (1970).Google Scholar
  32. Hagedorn, G., Bisanz, G., Duell, H.: Mannschaftsspiel. Frankfurt a. M. 1972.Google Scholar
  33. Hagedorn, G., Volpert, W., Schmidt, G.: Wissenschaftliche Trainingsplanung. Frankfurt a. M. 1972a.Google Scholar
  34. Hagedorn, G., Volpert, W., Schmidt, G.: Der Schnellangriff im Basketball. Frankfurt a. M. 1972b.Google Scholar
  35. Kaminski, G.: Bewegung — von außen und von innen gesehen. In: Sportwissenschaft 2, 51–63 (1972).Google Scholar
  36. Kaminski, G.: Superzeichen über Superzeichen (zu: W. Volpert, Sensomotorisches Lernen). In: Sportwissenschaft 2, 429–436 (1972).Google Scholar
  37. Klauer, K. J.: Lernen und Intelligenz. Weinheim/Berlin/Basel 1969.Google Scholar
  38. Levitt, S., Gutin, B.: Res. Quart. 42, 405–410 (1971).Google Scholar
  39. Locke, L.F., Jensen, M.: Prepackaged sports skills instructions: a review and discussion.Google Scholar
  40. J. Health, Phys. Ed. Recr., Sept. 1971, 57–59.Google Scholar
  41. Meinel, K.: Bewegungslehre. Berlin 1971.Google Scholar
  42. Ungerer, D.: Zur Theorie des sensomotorischen Lernens. Schorndorf 1971.Google Scholar
  43. Volpert, W.: Sensomotorisches Lernen. Frankfurt a. M. 1971.Google Scholar
  44. Max, L.W.: Experimental study of the motor theory of consciousness. J. comp. Psychol. 24, 301–344 (1937).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. McMahon, C. E.: Role of covert neuromuscular activity in the kinaesthetic hallucination. Unpub. Master’s thesis, Penn. State Univ. 1972.Google Scholar
  46. Richardson, A.: Has mental practice any relevance to physiotherapy? Physiotherapy 50, 148–151 (1964).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  47. Richardson, A.: Mental practice: a review and discussion. Res. Quart. 38, 95–107, 263–273 (1967).Google Scholar
  48. Shaw, W. A.: The relation of muscular action potentials to imaginai weight lifting. Arch. Psychol. 35, 1–50 (1940).Google Scholar
  49. Start, K.B.: Kinaesthesis and mental practice. Res. Quart. 35, 316–320 (1964).Google Scholar
  50. Dempsey, W.: The effects of physical practice, mental rehearsal and a visual aid upon the acquisition of a physical skill. Diploma diss. Univ. Manchester, England 1969.Google Scholar
  51. Kohl, K., Krüger, A.: Psychische Vorgänge bei der Sportmotorik. In: Leistungssport 2, 123–126 (1972).Google Scholar
  52. Oxendine, J.B.: Effect of mental practice on the learning of three motor skills. Res. Quart. 40, 755–763 (1969).Google Scholar
  53. Palagyi, M.: Wahrnehmungslehre. Leipzig 1925.Google Scholar
  54. Phipps, S. J., Morehouse, C.A.: Effects of mental practice on the acquisition of motor skills of varied difficulty. Res. Quart. 40, 773–778 (1969).Google Scholar
  55. Richardson, A.: Mental practice: A review and discussion I. Res. Quart. 38, 95–107 (1967a).Google Scholar
  56. Richardson, A.: Mental practice: A review and discussion II. Res. Quart. 38, 263–273 (1967b).Google Scholar
  57. Richardson, A.: Mental Imagery. New York 1969.Google Scholar
  58. Riley, E., Start, K.B.: The effect of the spacing of mental and physical practices on the acquisition of a physical skill. Aust. J. Phys. Educ. 20, 13–16 (1960).Google Scholar
  59. Shick, J.: Effects of mental practice on selected volleyball skills for women. Res. Quart. 41, 88–94 (1970).Google Scholar
  60. Stebbins, R. J.: A comparison of the effects of physical and mental practice in learning a motor skill. Res. Quart. 39, 714–720 (1968).Google Scholar
  61. Ulich, E.: Some experiments on the function of mental training in the acquisition of motor skills. Ergonomics 10, 411–419 (1967).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  62. Volkamer, M.: Experimente in der Sportpsychologie. Schorndorf 1972.Google Scholar
  63. Volpert, W.: Untersuchungen über den Einsatz des mentalen Trainings beim Erwerb einer sensomotorischen Fertigkeit. Köln 1969.Google Scholar
  64. Volpert, W.: Sensomotorisches Lernen. Frankfurt/M. 1971.Google Scholar
  65. Volpert, W.: Sensomotorisches Lernen. Zur Theorie des Trainings in Industrie und Sport. Frankfurt/M. 1972.Google Scholar
  66. Cratty, B.J.: Movement Behaviour and Motor Learning. 2nd ed., Philadelphia 1967.Google Scholar
  67. Fetz, F.: Allgemeine Methodik der Leibesübungen. Frankfurt 1971.Google Scholar
  68. Rollett, B., Weltner, K.: Programmierte Instruktion und Leibeserziehung. In: J. Recla (ed.): Methodik der Leibesübungen, 291–298. Graz 1969.Google Scholar
  69. Skinner, B.F.: Science and Human Behaviour. New York 1953.Google Scholar
  70. Ungerer, D.: Zur Theorie des sensomotorischen Lernens. Schorndorf 1971.Google Scholar
  71. Weltner, K.: Video-Trainer. In: B. Rollett (ed.): Praxis und Theorie des Programmierten Unterrichts, 41–47. München 1970.Google Scholar
  72. Betsch, M.: Strukturanalyse und Basaltextdarstellung. In: J. Recla, K. Koch, D. Ungerer (ed.): Neue Beiträge zur Methodik der Leibesübungen. Schorndorf 1972.Google Scholar
  73. Daugs, R., Volck, G.: Lehrprogramme Schwimmen (Theoretische Grundlage und praktische Erprobung). In: Kongreßbericht des Internationalen Lehrgangs für Methodik der Leibesübungen. Graz, Schorndorf 1973.Google Scholar
  74. Dietrich, K.: Möglichkeiten des Einsatzes audio-visueller Techniken in der Leibeserziehung. In: J. Recla (ed.): Methodik der Leibesübungen. Graz 1969.Google Scholar
  75. Fetz, F.: Erfahrungen mit programmiertem Unterricht in Leibesübungen. In: Leibesübungen — Leibeserziehung 6, 122–127 (1972).Google Scholar
  76. Fischer, J.: Technische Erläuterungen zum computergezeichneten „Hitch Kick“. In: J. Recla (ed.): Methodik der Leibesübungen. Graz 1969.Google Scholar
  77. Frank, H.: Die Bewältigung des zukünftigen didaktischen Informationsumsatzes durch kybernetische Methoden und Maschinen. In: U. Lehnert (ed.): Elektronische Datenverarbeitung in Schule und Ausbildung. München, Wien 1970.Google Scholar
  78. Hagedorn, G., Volpert, W., Schmidt, G.: Wissenschaftliche Trainingsplanung. Frankfurt 1972.Google Scholar
  79. Hartley, B., Putschkat, F.: Computer-Assisted Learning — Individuelles Üben und Lernen mit einer Datenverarbeitungsanlage. In: U. Lehnert (ed.): Elektronische Datenverarbeitung in Schule und Ausbildung. München, Wien 1970.Google Scholar
  80. Miller, G.A., Galanter, E., Pribram, K.H.: Plans and the Structure of Behavior. London, New York, Sydney, Toronto 1970.Google Scholar
  81. Orton, K.D.: The Effects of Certain Response Characteristics in Programmed Instruction on Errors, Rate of Learning, and Retention. Nebraska University. Lincoln 1967.Google Scholar
  82. Rollett, B., Weltner, K.: Programmierte Instruktion und Leibeserziehung. In: J. Recla (ed.): Methodik der Leibesübungen. Graz 1969.Google Scholar
  83. Thiemel, F.: Programmiertes Lehren und Lernen im Sport. In: Die Leibeserziehung 19, 295–302 (1970).Google Scholar
  84. Ungerer, D.: V. Symposium über Lehrmaschinen und Programmierte Instruktion. In: Die Leibeserziehung 16, 416–418 (1967).Google Scholar
  85. Ungerer, D.: Computer und programmierter Unterricht in der Leibeserziehung. In: J. Recla (ed.): Methodik der Leibesübungen. Graz 1969a.Google Scholar
  86. Ungerer, D.: Die verbale Information beim Lernen des “Hitch Kick”. In: J. Recla (ed.): Methodik der Leibesübungen. Graz 1969b.Google Scholar
  87. Ungerer, D.: Ein Lehrprogramm für das Kraulen. In: J. Recla (ed.): Methodik der Leibesübungen. Graz 1969c.Google Scholar
  88. Ungerer, D.: Sensomotorischer Lernprozeß und Programmierte Instruktion. In: B. Rollett (ed.): Praxis und Theorie der Programmierten Instruktion. Stuttgart, München 1970.Google Scholar
  89. Ungerer, D.: Zur Theorie des sensomotorischen Lernens. Schorndorf 1972.Google Scholar
  90. Weltner, K.: Der Video-Trainer. In: B. Rollett (ed.): Praxis und Theorie der Programmierten Instruktion. Stuttgart, München 1970.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Müller-Limmroth
    • 1
  • L. Pickenhain
    • 2
  • J. Wartenweiler
    • 3
  • R. Margaria
    • 4
  • H. Groh
    • 5
  • O. Popescu
    • 6
  • M. Belloiu
    • 7
  • C. Belloiu
    • 7
  • R. Ballreich
    • 8
  • I. M. Portnov
    • 9
  • E. Ulich
    • 5
  • K. B. Start
    • 10
  • K. Kohl
    • 11
  • W. Volpert
    • 5
  • K. Weltner
    • 12
  • D. Ungerer
    • 11
  1. 1.MunichGermany
  2. 2.LeipzigGermany
  3. 3.ZürichGermany
  4. 4.MilanItaly
  5. 5.CologneGermany
  6. 6.BucharestRomania
  7. 7.SofiaBulgaria
  8. 8.FrankfurtGermany
  9. 9.MoscowRussia
  10. 10.SloughUK
  11. 11.BerlinGermany
  12. 12.FrankfurtGermany

Personalised recommendations