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The Trigeminal System

  • Ian Darian-Smith
Part of the Handbook of Sensory Physiology book series (SENSORY, volume 2)

Abstract

Sensations elicited from the oro-facial region in man and other vertebrates have an importance to the animal beyond those evoked from other somatic tissues. The trigeminal afferent system is organized to serve both the general and the unique somatic sensory functions of this complex area, an area which includes the facial skin and underlying supportive tissues, the cornea, the mucocutaneous junctional tissues bounding the mouth and nostrils, the nasal mucosae, the tongue and teeth, the muscles of mastication, and possibly the extra-ocular muscles. The afferent supply of the meningeal lining of the anterior and middle cranial fossae is also trigeminal, and in primates the facial mimetic muscles mah have a trigeminal afferent innervation. Homology within the trigeminal and spinal somatic afferent systems is to be expected only in those neuronal pathways serving similar sensory functions. One aim in the investigation of the trigeminal sensory system is to identify not only those neural mechanisms that have a structural and functional parallel in the spinal somatic sensory system, but also those mechanisms that subserve a special local sensory role.

Keywords

Trigeminal Neuralgia Trigeminal Nucleus Spinal Trigeminal Nucleus Trigeminal System Free Nerve Ending 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin · HeidelBerg 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ian Darian-Smith
    • 1
  1. 1.BaltimoreUSA

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