Hormonal Control of Flowering in Citrus and Some Other Woody Perennials

  • E. E. Goldschmidt
  • S. P. Monselise

Abstract

Citrus trees, like other polycarpic plants, maintain a balance between vegetative and reproductive growth by transforming each year only a certain percentage of their meristems into flowers, while the rest continues to produce vegetative growth which ensures the plant’s future.

Keywords

Sugar Hull Alba Gibberellin Elon 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. E. Goldschmidt
    • 1
  • S. P. Monselise
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of CitricultureHebrew UniversityRehovotIsrael

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