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Tropical forests and the global carbon cycle: estimating state and change in biomass density

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Forest Ecosystems, Forest Management and the Global Carbon Cycle

Part of the book series: NATO ASI Series ((ASII,volume 40))

Abstract

Tropical forests have an important role in the global carbon (C) cycle because of their existing large areal extent, high rates of deforestation, large C pool in vegetation and soil, and high rates of C emissions resulting from conversion to other uses (equivalent to between 22 and 37% of current fossil fuel C emissions) (Table 11.1). Tropical forests currently account for about 43% of the global forest area (Dixon et al. 1994), most of which is in tropical America (52%), followed by tropical Africa (30%) and tropical Asia (18%). They occur mostly as lowland formations where 88% are at an elevation of 1000 m or less. Within the lowlands, 47% are in the rain forest ecological zone, 38% in the moist deciduous zone, and 15% in the dry to very dry zone (Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) 1993).

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© 1996 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

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Brown, S. (1996). Tropical forests and the global carbon cycle: estimating state and change in biomass density. In: Apps, M.J., Price, D.T. (eds) Forest Ecosystems, Forest Management and the Global Carbon Cycle. NATO ASI Series, vol 40. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-61111-7_13

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-61111-7_13

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-642-64699-7

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-642-61111-7

  • eBook Packages: Springer Book Archive

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