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Learning Interfaces

  • Philippe Duchastel
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 145)

Abstract

‘Learning interfaces’ are the windows on the world through which a person views information and which cause a certain quality of learning to occur. Interfaces to learning are the cognitive artifacts, the resources for learning, that populate the learning environment and occasion learning. I believe this view of instruction and learning may prove useful in situating our efforts at improving learning within a larger perspective than we usually adopt in our professional dialogue.

Keywords

Interface learning theory instructional design schooling 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philippe Duchastel
    • 1
  1. 1.EDSBeverly HillsUSA

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