Creation of Artificial Symbiosis Between Azotobacter and Higher Plants

  • É. Preininger
  • P. Koränyi
  • I. Gyurjän

Summary

An artificial symbiosis was established between diazotrophic Azomonas insignis and strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa). The partnership was created by in vitro techniques through callus induction and organogenesis. The basis of this partnership is the bacterial dependence on the plant’s metabolic activity, using maltose in the medium as a carbon and energy source which can be utilized by the plant cells only.

The presence of bacteria in the intercellular spaces of the callus tissues and re-generated plants was proven by microscopic techniques. Nitrogenase activity could also be detected in the plant tissues.

Preliminary experiments were carried out using a biolistic gun in order to ensure a higher incidence of bacterium introduction. This method may allow the incorporation of bacteria into the cells too.

Keywords

Strawberry Fragaria x ananassa Azomonas insignis Symbiosis Endocytobiosis Organogenesis 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • É. Preininger
    • 1
  • P. Koränyi
    • 1
  • I. Gyurjän
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant AnatomyEötvös Loränd UniversityBudapestHungary

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