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Design of Dominant Negatives to bHLHZip Proteins that Inhibit DNA Binding

  • D. Krylov
  • D. R. Echlin
  • E. J. Taparowsky
  • C. Vinson
Chapter
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 224)

Abstract

The Myc oncogene is a transcription factor that heterodimerizes with a partner protein termed Max to bind sequence-specific DNA (Blackwood and Eisenman, 1991). Both Myc and Max are members of the basic-helix-loop-helix/leucine zipper (bHLHZip) family of transcription factors (Murre, et al., 1989). The Myc/Max heterodimer binds the DNA sequence CACGTG, termed the Myc E box, and activates transcription from these sites (Blackwood, et al., 1992; Henriksson and Luscher, 1996). Provocatively, several other bHLHZip proteins, including the two USF family members and the four TFE family members, also bind and can transactivate E box DNA sequences (Desbrarats, et al., 1996). These proteins however have not been implicated in oncogenesis suggesting a more subtle mechanism exists to discriminate between the promoters relevant to cellular transformation by Myc. An unresolved question is if there is competition between different bHLHZip proteins for binding to the same cis element, with some bHLHZip proteins acting as repressors while others can act as activators, depending on the exact context of the promoter.

Keywords

Basic Region Thermal Denaturation Leucine Zipper Nuclear Localization Sequence bZIP Family 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Krylov
    • 1
  • D. R. Echlin
    • 2
  • E. J. Taparowsky
    • 2
  • C. Vinson
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Biochemistry, National Cancer InstituteNational Institutes of Health BethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Biological SciencesPurdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA

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