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Quality and Therapeutic Advances in Multimodality Neuromonitoring Following Head Injury

  • J. Meixensberger
  • A. Jäger
  • J. Dings
  • S. Baunach
  • K. Roosen
Chapter

Abstract

While primary brain damage after trauma cannot be influenced by therapy, the major goal in the treatment of severely head injured patients is to prevent secondary ischemic brain damage. It is well known that secondary ischemic insults caused by arterial hypoxia and hypocapnia, systemic hypotension, or increased intracranial pressure (ICP) destroy functional brain tissue and worsen outcome after acute brain injury [2].

Keywords

Cerebral Blood Flow Mean Arterial Pressure Head Injury Severe Head Injury Acute Brain Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Meixensberger
  • A. Jäger
  • J. Dings
  • S. Baunach
  • K. Roosen

There are no affiliations available

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