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Cyanobacterial Toxins: Occurrence, Modes of Action, Health Effects and Exposure Routes

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Part of the Archives of Toxicology book series (TOXICOLOGY,volume 19)

Summary

Cyanobacterial toxins are produced by terrestrial- fresh-, brackish- and sea-water cyanobacteria of cosmopolitan occurrence. These toxins present acute and chronic hazards to human and animal health and are responsible for isolated, sporadic animal fatalities (mammals, fish, birds) each year. Human health problems are associated with the ingestion of, and contact with cyanobacterial blooms and their toxins. Modes of action of cyanobacterial neurotoxins, hepatotoxins and skin irritants are considered. Recent indications of the accumulation of cyanobacterial toxins in fish, their effect on crop plants and their association with the deaths of human dialysis patients are discussed. These findings and events indicate an incomplete understanding of the exposure routes of these natural toxins and the need for greater awareness of their occurrence and properties among users of waterbodies which are prone to cyanobacterial bloom development.

Keywords

  • Granular Activate Carbon
  • Cyanobacterial Bloom
  • Exposure Route
  • Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning
  • Mouse Bioassay

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 1997 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

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Codd, G.A., Ward, C.J., Bell, S.G. (1997). Cyanobacterial Toxins: Occurrence, Modes of Action, Health Effects and Exposure Routes. In: Seiler, J.P., Vilanova, E. (eds) Applied Toxicology: Approaches Through Basic Science. Archives of Toxicology, vol 19. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-60682-3_38

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-60682-3_38

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

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