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Model and Data Requirements for Simulation of Runoff and Land Surface Processes

  • Jens Christian Refsgaard
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 46)

Abstract

Hydrological models are usually applied under stationary climatological conditions and for purposes other than predicting the effects of climate change. Hence, important questions with regard to application of hydrological models within the global environmental change context are: (a) whether such models are applicable for this purpose; (b) which special test schemes are necessary in order to validate hydrological models for this purpose; (c) which special requirements this type of application puts to hydrological models; and (d) what are the data requirements for application of hydrological models in this context.

Keywords

World Meteorological Organization Global Circulation Model Runoff Data Runoff Simulation Monthly Discharge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jens Christian Refsgaard
    • 1
  1. 1.Danish Hydraulic Institute (DHI)HorsholmDenmark

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