Human Contacts in Knowledge Society: An Analytical Perspective

  • Kiyoshi Kobayashi
  • Kei Fukuyama

Abstract

Supported by the highly advanced technologies of information/communication and transportation, the new knowledge society has been emerging. Newly developed transportation and communication technologies are diffused in the society, resulting in the rapid increase in the flexibility and the degree of freedom of human communication behaviours. The technological innovation of communications in the society does not only mean more rapid and efficient transmission of information and knowledge, it also expands the possibility of interactions of various types of activities in the spatially distant areas. The increased opportunity of communications in the society, greatly affecting the communication behaviours, brings about the structural evolution of social systems themselves.

Keywords

Europe Transportation Marketing Agglomeration Arena 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Beckmann, M. J., 1994, On knowledge networks in science: collaboration among equals, The Annals of Regional Science, 28: 233 – 242.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Ben-Akiva, M. and Lerman, S. R., 1987, Discrete Choice Analysis: Theory and Application to Travel Demand, Cambridge: The MIT Press.Google Scholar
  3. Bonsall, P., 1992, The influence of route guidance advice on route choice in urban networks, Transportation, 19: 1 – 23.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Bray, M. M. and Sabin, N. E., 1986, Rational expectations equilibria, learning and model specification, Econometrica, 54: 1129 – 1160.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Cagan, P., 1956, The Monetary dynamics of hyperinflation, In: Friedman, M. (Ed.), Studies in the Quantity Theory of Money, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  6. Chang, G. and Mahmassani, H., 1988, Travel time prediction and departure adjustment behaviour dynamics in a congested traffic system, Transportation Research22B: 217 – 232.Google Scholar
  7. Daganzo, C., 1979, Multinomial Probit, New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  8. DeCanio, S. J., 1979, Rational expectations and learning from experience, Quarterly Journal of Economics, 370: 47 – 57.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Domencich, T. A. and McFadden, D., 1975, Urban Travel Demand: A Behavioral Analysis, Amsterdam: North–Holland.Google Scholar
  10. Finney, D., 1971, Probit Analysis, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Fourgeand, C. C. G. and Pradel, J., 1987, Learning procedures and convergence to rationality, Econometrica, 54: 845 – 868.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Grossman, S., 1989, The Informational Role of Prices, Cambridge: The MIT Press.Google Scholar
  13. Hellwig, M. F., 1980, On the aggregation of information in capital markets, Journal of Economic Theory, 22: 477 – 498.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Iida, Y., Akiyama, T. and Uchida, T., 1992, Experimental analysis of dynamic route choice behaviour, Transportation Research, 26B: 17 – 32.Google Scholar
  15. Kobayashi, K., 1993, Incomplete information and logistical network equilibria, In: Andersson, Å. E., Batten, D. F., Kobayashi, K., and Yoshikawa, K., (eds.), The Cosmo–Creative Society, Berlin: Springer–Verlag.Google Scholar
  16. Kobayashi, K., Sunao, S. and Yoshikawa, K., 1993, Spatial equilibria with knowledge production with meeting facilities, In: Andersson, Â. E., Batten, D. F., Kobayashi, K., and Yoshikawa, K., The Cosmo–Creative Society, Berlin: Springer–Verlag.Google Scholar
  17. Kobayashi, K., 1994, Information, rational expectations and network equilibria, The Annals of Regional Science, 28: 369 – 393.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Le Goff, J., 1980, Time, & Culture in the Middle Ages, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  19. Lippman, S. A. and McCall, J. J., 1982, The Economics of Uncertainty: Selected Topics and Probabilistic Methods, In: Arrow, K. J. and Intriligator, M. D. (Eds.), Handbook of Mathematical Economics, 1:211–284, Amsterdam: North Holland.Google Scholar
  20. Lucas, R. E. Jr., 1978, Asset prices in an exchange economy, Econometrica, 46: 1429 – 1445.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. McFadden, D., 1974, Conditional logit analysis of qualitative choice behavior, In: Zarembka, P., (ed.), Frontiers in Econometrics, New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  22. Metzler, L., 1941, The Nature and Stability of inventory cycles, Review of Economics and Statistics, 23: 113 – 129.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Muth, J., 1961, Rational expectations and the theory of price movements, Econometrica, 29: 315 – 335.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Palander, T., 1935, Beiträge zur Standortstheorie, Uppsala: Almqvist & Wiksell.Google Scholar
  25. Radner, R., 1979, Rational expectations equilibrium: Generic existence and information revealed by price, Econometrica, 47: 3: 655 – 678.Google Scholar
  26. Radner, R., 1982, Equilibrium under Uncertainty, In: Arrow, K. J. and Intriligator, M. D. (Eds.), Handbook of Mathematical Economics, 2: 923 – 1006, Amsterdam: North–Holland.Google Scholar
  27. Sheffrin, S. M., 1983, Rational Expectations, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  28. Shiller, R. J., 1978, Rational expectations and the dynamic structure of macroeconomic models, Journal of Monetary Economics, 4: 1 – 44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Schumpeter, J. A., 1908, Das Wesen und der Hauptinhalt der Theoretichen Nationalèkonomie. Leipzig: Duncker & Humblot.Google Scholar
  30. Van Zuylen, H. J. and Willumsen, L. G., 1980, The most likely trip matrix estimated from traffic counts, Transportation Research, 14B: 281 – 293.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kiyoshi Kobayashi
    • 1
  • Kei Fukuyama
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Civil Engineering, Graduate School of EngineeringKyoto UniversityJapan
  2. 2.Department of Social Systems EngineeringTottori UniversityJapan

Personalised recommendations