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Long-term Development Patterns of Peripheral Desert Settlements

  • Boris A. Portnov
  • Evyatar Erell

Abstract

The desert, whose hot and dry climate is generally unsuitable for fanning without importing water, was traditionally considered an unfavorable place for human habitation. Although deserts encompass more than one-third of the world’s land mass (Maddock 1977), there are few historic and pre-historic urban settlements in desert areas. In recent years, however, the pace of desert urbanization has changed; a number of urban settlements in desert regions across the globe were either established or received a significant growth impetus. Examples include Phoenix and Tucson, Arizona; Be’er Sheva and Eilat in Israel; Pilbara in Western Australia; Ashgabat and Mary in Turkmenistan.

Keywords

Arid Zone Desert Area Urban Locality Urban Settlement Development Cluster 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Boris A. Portnov
    • 1
  • Evyatar Erell
    • 1
  1. 1.J. Blaustein Institute for Desert ResearchBen-Gurion University of the NegevSede-Boker CampusIsrael

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