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Desert Regions pp 187-204 | Cite as

Planning Theories versus Reality: A Desert Case Study

  • Isaac A. Meir

Abstract

Theories and models are by definition of an abstract, general nature. Thus, they refer to no place in particular and, consequently, are disconnected from landscape, climate and culture. This is especially so with theories based on economics and statistics, or with different design fashions, such as those we have witnessed in the last century.

Keywords

Open Space High Rise Building Central Business District Master Plan Cluster Type 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Isaac A. Meir
    • 1
  1. 1.J. Blaustein Institute for Desert ResearchBen Gurion University of the NegevNegevIsrael

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