Sexual dimorphism and stamen development in the dioecious white campion

  • A. Lardon
  • S. Georgiev
  • N. Barbacar
  • F. Monéger
  • C. Delichère
  • I. Negrutiu

Abstract

Among the flowering plants, hermaphrodite sexuality (plants bearing bisexual flowers with both stamens and pistil) represents the most common mode of reproduction (near 72% of species). Approximately one-tenth of all angiosperms are strictly dioecious (male plants bearing only staminate flowers and female plants only pistilate flowers) or monoecious (separate male flowers and female flowers on the same plant). Intermediate forms of sexual dimorphism, including gynodioecy and androdioecy, represent 7% of plant species, whereas 10% of plant species possess both unisexual and bisexual flowers (Dellaporta and Calderon-Urrea 1993). Most of the plants used as model have hermaphrodite flowers, which makes the cloning of genes expressed specifically during either male or female reproductive organ development difficult.

Keywords

Flavonoid Pectin Ligase eDNA 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Lardon
  • S. Georgiev
  • N. Barbacar
  • F. Monéger
  • C. Delichère
  • I. Negrutiu
    • 1
  1. 1.Ecole Normale Supérieure de LyonRDP - UMR 9938 CNRS/INRA/ENSLyonFrance

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