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Vaccines pp 93-119 | Cite as

Vaccines Against Measles, Mumps, Rubella, and Varicella

  • E. Norrby
Part of the Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology book series (HEP, volume 133)

Abstract

There are good reasons to draws parallels between the vaccines against the four diseases measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella. Each is a classical systemic childhood disease, and infection with wild-types of each of these viruses bequeaths a life-long protection upon renewed exposure to the infectious agent. Furthermore, live vaccines effectively preventing each of these tour diseases have been developed by empirical techniques. However, there are also important differences in pathogenic events connected with the acute diseases caused by these agents.

Keywords

Measle Virus Live Vaccine Herd Immunity Rubella Virus Measle Vaccine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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