A Worldwide Uniform High-Resolution Stratigraphie Standard with Data for the Neogene and Paleogene

  • Peter Smolka

Abstract

The understanding of process-dynamics requires fixing observations into a framework that is independent of the observations themselves. This framework, independent of the characteristics of the process studied, is time. Thus, in the sense of dating, stratigraphy is the basis of studies focusing on the understanding of paleooceanography, paleoclimatology and ecology. Up to now classical biostratigraphy was applicable only locally or regionally due to the diachroneity of zones. However recently, various assays have been introduced for both relative and “absolute” dating. These include cyclostratigraphy, which especially in the Quaternary reaches unprecedented resolution in suitable areas. Evolution as a phenomenon is not diachronous; therefore, a worldwide uniform evolution-based high-resolution stratigraphy for pre-Quaternary times is introduced and tested with both new and old data from the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) and Ocean Drilling Program (ODP. The results yielded both new evolutive age-ranges (generally larger than previously known) for thousands of planktonic species as well as stable and consistent high-resolution age-models for a large number of drillsites from the DSDP and ODP. Although applied to the Neogene and Paleogene, the new method, called BDLOG-Lingula-Search, can be applied to any fossil class worldwide. The age-ranges and age-models are available on the accompanying CD-ROM.

Keywords

Drilling Miocene Stratigraphy Pleistocene Eocene 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Smolka
    • 1
  1. 1.Geological InstituteUniversity MuensterMuensterGermany

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