Developmental Psychopathology

  • H. Remschmidt
  • E. Fombonne

Abstract

There can be no doubt that the developmental perspective is of great importance for the understanding of psychiatric disturbances in children and adolescents. Developmental physiology, developmental neurology, and developmental psychology are basic sciences of child psychiatry. The developmental perspective can be looked upon as a kind of bridge between the different disciplines or as a unifying concept (Eisenberg 1977), integrating different scientific and practical approaches to normality and psychopathology, not only for children, but also for adults. Though there is general agreement about this view, we are far away from a comprehensive and substantial theory of development that would be able to integrate earlier and recent knowledge - and at the same time be open to new hypotheses and results.

Keywords

Depression Schizophrenia Testosterone Constipation Tate 

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  • H. Remschmidt
  • E. Fombonne

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