Advertisement

Foreign Direct Investment: Problems in Deepening the Integration of the Baltic Sea Region

  • Urpo Kivikari
Chapter

Abstract

The growth of intra-Baltic trade in the 1990s has laid the foundation for an economic region around the Baltic Sea. But commodity trade alone cannot unify a market, let alone furnish it with a distinctive identity. Rather, the intensification of integration is reflected in the increased mobility of factors of production. It is foreign direct investment that significantly promotes the formation of new networks and leads to a long-term convergence and integration of the national economies.

Keywords

Host Country Market Economy Foreign Investment Direct Investment Foreign Firm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Borsos, J. and Erkkilä, M. (1996). ‘Regional Integration in the Baltic Rim: FDI and Trade Based Integration in Finland, Estonia and St. Petersburg,’ pages 85–166 in Regional Integration and Transition Economies: The Case of Baltic Rim. Centre for Co-operation with the Economies in Transition, OECDGoogle Scholar
  2. Djarova, J. (1996). ‘Foreign Investments in Central and Eastern Europe,’ pages 55–88 in Djarova, J. (ed.). Foreign Direct Investment in Central and Eastern Europe. Erasmus University, RotterdamGoogle Scholar
  3. Djarova, J., Rietveldtand, O. and van Rossum du Chattel, O. (1996). Foreign Direct Investments: Survey on Theories and Determinants,’ pages 55–88 in Djarova, J. (ed.). Foreign Direct Investment in Central and Eastern Europe. Erasmus University, Rotterdam.Google Scholar
  4. Economic Survey of Europe in 1995–1996 (1996). UN Economic Commission for Europe.Google Scholar
  5. Euromoney (1996). ‘Asian Economies Start to Slip.’ September, pages 200–205.Google Scholar
  6. From Plan to Market’ (1996). World Development Report 1996. World Bank.Google Scholar
  7. Gatling, R. (1993). ‘Foreign Investment in Eastern Europe.’ The Economist Intelligence Unit.Google Scholar
  8. Gheciu, M. (1996). ‘The Legal Framework of the Foreign Investment in Central and East-European Countries,’ Journal of East-West Business: 2 (3/4), pages 125–142.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Hirvensalo, I. (1996). Strategic Adaptation of Enterprises to Turbulent Transitionary Markets. ETLA, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy, A 24 Series.Google Scholar
  10. Kaarre, M. (1996). ‘Foreign Direct Investments in Telecommunications in St. Petersburg and the Baltic States,’ in Regional Integration and Transition Economies: The Case of Baltic Rim. Centre for Co-operation with the Economies in Transition, OECD.Google Scholar
  11. Kivikari, U. (1988). ‘Special Operations: Solution or Substitution in East-West Trade,’ Nordic Journal of Soviet & East European Studies: 5, No. I, pages 55–62.Google Scholar
  12. Kivikari, U. (1996). The Legacy of Hansa: The Baltic Economic Region. Otava Publishing Company.Google Scholar
  13. Laurila, J. and Hirvensalo, I. (1996). ‘Direct Investment from Finland to Eastern Europe: Results of the 1995 Bank of Finland Survey,’ Review of Economies in Transition: 5, Bank of Finland, pages 5–25.Google Scholar
  14. Linderfalk, B. (1996). ‘Baltic Business: Foreign Investment Show the Way,’ The Baltic Times, Dec. 19, 1996-Jan. 8, 1997, page 11.Google Scholar
  15. Meyer, K.E. (1995). ‘Direct Foreign Investment in Eastern Europe: The Role of Labor Costs,’ Comparative Economic Studies: XXXVII, No. 4, pages 69–88.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Paliwoda, S.J. (1995). Investing in Eastern Europe Capitalizing on Emerging Markets. Addison-Wesley Publishing Company.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Urpo Kivikari

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations