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Community Diversity and Succession: The Roles of Competition, Dispersal, and Habitat Modification

  • D. Tilman
Part of the Praktische Zahnmedizin Odonto-Stomatologie Pratique Practical Dental Medicine book series (SSE, volume 99)

Abstract

The rapid expansion of human activities is causing unprecedented changes in the structure, dynamics, and diversity of the earth’s ecosystems (e.g., Ehrlich and Ehrlich 1981; Wilson 1988; Ehrlich and Wilson 1991). Although change is the rule in nature, the present speed of habitat destruction and global climatic change are unlikely to have occurred ever during the 400 million years since land plants evolved (e.g., Huntly 1991). Thus, there is little historical information that can fully prepare us for the impacts of anthropogenic global change. An understanding of the ways in which communities respond to perturbations (e.g., see Körner, ) and of the mechanisms that maintain biodiversity within communities may provide some insights into the process, as may historical information. Conservation of biodiversity in the face of global change requires a much fuller knowledge of the forces that maintain diversity.

Keywords

Competitive Ability Environmental Constraint Forest Succession Secondary Succession Successional Sequence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

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  • D. Tilman

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