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Rare and Common Plants in Ecosystems, with Special Reference to the South-west Australian Flora

  • J. S. Pate
  • S. D. Hopper
Part of the Praktische Zahnmedizin Odonto-Stomatologie Pratique Practical Dental Medicine book series (SSE, volume 99)

Abstract

A commonplace observation of overriding ecological significance is that organisms differ greatly in distribution and abundance. A few (e.g., Homo sapiens and Poa annua) are cosmopolitan and numerous, but most are limited to precise geographical regions, and some are extremely rare and highly localized. Explaining why this is so is a primary focus of biological science.

Keywords

Seed Bank Rare Species Cluster Root Common Plant Granite Outcrop 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. S. Pate
  • S. D. Hopper

There are no affiliations available

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