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Principles of Power Deposition Models

  • K. D. Paulsen
Part of the Medical Radiology book series (MEDRAD)

Abstract

One interpretation of the mixed clinical results that have been reported over the last decade (e.g., see Curran and Goodman 1992) on the therapeutic benefits of hyperthermia as an adjuvant cancer therapy is that consistently heating tumors is a difficult task which remains problematic. A tracking of the device development for hyperthermic delivery that has occurred over this time frame lends support to this view. While some relatively simple methods are being used with success (e.g.,

Keywords

Finite Difference Time Domain Integral Equation Method Computational Accuracy Power Deposition Finite Difference Time Domain Method 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. D. Paulsen
    • 1
  1. 1.Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth CollegeHanoverUSA

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