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Brain Anatomy, Impairments and Driving

  • Adriaan H. van Zomeren
  • Frederiec K. Withaar
  • Wiebo H. Brouwer
Conference paper

Abstract

Brain damage can cause impairments in functions relevant for driving, such as perception, attention, judgment, decision making and motor functions. Thus, the question arises whether anatomical structures in the brain can be related to aspects of the driving task. If these relationships would be known, one might predict the problems a particular patient will meet in traffic, on the basis of his lesion.

Keywords

Brain Damage Brain Anatomy Visuospatial Attention Aphasic Patient Tactical Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adriaan H. van Zomeren
    • 1
  • Frederiec K. Withaar
    • 1
  • Wiebo H. Brouwer
    • 1
  1. 1.University Hospital GroningenGroningenThe Netherlands

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