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Motorization in Developing Countries Implications for Public and Private Sectors

  • Zmarak Shalizi
Conference paper

Abstract

This paper was presented at the Fourth Annual Conference on Transportation, Traffic Safety and Health. October 21–22, 1998. Tokyo, Japan. The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed in this paper are entirely of the author’s. They do not necessarily represent the views of the World Bank, its Executive Directors, or the countries they represent. The author would like to acknowledge his appreciation for the able research assistance provided by Ely sa Coles.

Keywords

Motor Vehicle Negative Externality Road Traffic Accident Urban Agglomeration Traffic Safety 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zmarak Shalizi
    • 1
  1. 1.The World BankUSA

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