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Anatomy, Embryology, Histology and Physiology of the Spleen

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Medical Imaging of the Spleen

Part of the book series: Medical Radiology ((Med Radiol Diagn Imaging))

Abstract

The spleen is the largest lymphoid organ in the body and is interposed within the circulatory system. The spleen has multiple functions in the human body:

  1. 1.

    It clears the circulation of micro-organisms, par- ticulate antigens and other foreign material.

  2. 2.

    It makes the majority of antibodies and enhances cellular immunity to antigens.

  3. 3.

    It removes normal and abnormal blood cells from the circulation.

  4. 4.

    It plays an important role in extramedullary haematopoiesis.

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© 2000 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

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Stevens, W.J., Bortier, H., Van Meir, F. (2000). Anatomy, Embryology, Histology and Physiology of the Spleen. In: De Schepper, A.M., Vanhoenacker, F. (eds) Medical Imaging of the Spleen. Medical Radiology. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-57045-2_1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-57045-2_1

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-642-62997-6

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-642-57045-2

  • eBook Packages: Springer Book Archive

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