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Transgenic Vegetable and Forage Brassica Species: Rape, Kale, Turnip and Rutabaga (Swede)

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Part of the Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry book series (AGRICULTURE,volume 47)

Abstract

The economically important Brassica genus contains about 85 species. The six cultivated Brassica species are interrelated with the three amphidiploids (B. napus, B. juncea and B. carinata) arising from interspecific hybridization between the three diploid species (B. oleracea, B. nigra and B. campestris; U 1935). In addition to many important vegetable species, Brassica includes oilseed (rape and turnip), vegetables and forage (turnip, swede, rape, kale) species. Turnips and swedes provide winter fodder for sheep and cattle (McNaughton 1976). In New Zealand, arable Brassica crops have been important for animal production since 1870. They are used to supplement pasture for sheep and cattle when pasture growth is not sufficient (Palmer 1983).

Keywords

  • Hairy Root
  • Hairy Root Culture
  • Brassica Species
  • Hairy Root Line
  • Transgenic Hairy Root

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Christey, M.C., Braun, R.H. (2001). Transgenic Vegetable and Forage Brassica Species: Rape, Kale, Turnip and Rutabaga (Swede). In: Bajaj, Y.P.S. (eds) Transgenic Crops II. Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry, vol 47. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-56901-2_7

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-56901-2_7

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

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