Recent Developments in System Ecology

  • S. E. Jørgensen
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter considers whether the time is ripe to develop a theory — or rather a pattern of theories — for ecosystems? It is shown that it is possible based on one core hypothesis and 7 propositions to explain 30 other propositions, that are mainly based on ecosystem observations. The confirmation of these 30 propositions is based on tests on models and tests directed towards a hypothetical, already existing, pattern of ecosystem theories. It is therefore concluded that the time is ripe to develop a better theoretical basis for a more profound understanding of ecosystem behavior and properties.

Keywords

System ecology Ecosystem propositions Exergy Thermodynamics Pattern of ecosystem theories 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

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  • S. E. Jørgensen

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