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Source Control pp 409-411 | Cite as

Invited Commentary

  • Thomas Sautner
Chapter

Abstract

Although there is broad agreement on the optimal surgical therapy of peritonitis, the concept of intervention to avert imminent failure of this therapy is much less clear. Dr. Lipsett clearly points out that patients successfully managed with a single operation fare better than those who need multiple operations. Fortunately a patient's intra-abdominal infection may be resolved at the first attempt in the majority of cases If, however, the source cannot be controlled early, a scheduled reoperation is indispensable.

Keywords

Abdominal Compartment Syndrome Intraabdominal Infection Diffuse Peritonitis Periodic Health Examination Abdominal Repair 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Reference

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas Sautner

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