Source Control pp 217-229 | Cite as

Diabetic Foot

  • Daniel Vega
  • Kristine West
  • Jose M. Tellado
Chapter

Abstract

Diabetic foot is a syndrome involving pain, deformation, inflammation, infection, ulceration, and tissue loss of the foot in diabetic patients. • Neuropathy, ischemia, and infection are the principal pathogenic factors. • Clinical features are neuropathic and ischemic ulcers and infection. • Diagnosis should identify and grade neuropathology, osteopathy, and vascular pathology. • Treatment involves relieving weight from the ulcerated area, treating infection, and restoring arterial perfusion.

Keywords

Ischemia Foam Neuropathy Vancomycin Hyperglycemia 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel Vega
  • Kristine West
  • Jose M. Tellado

There are no affiliations available

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