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Giant Carbonate Mounds and Current-Swept Seafloors on the Slopes of the Southern Rockall Trough

  • A. M. Akhmetzhanov
  • N. H. Kenyon
  • M. K. Ivanov
  • A. J. Wheeler
  • P. V. Shashkin
  • T. C. E. van Weering

Abstract

Large mounds in the northern Porcupine Seabight were first described from seismic profiles by (1994) and proposed to be carbonate knolls. Higher resolution seismic showed some unusual shapes for these mounds (Henriet et al. 1998), and sidescan sonar and sampling proved them to be carbonate mud mounds of various shapes and settings associated with abundant cold water corals (Kenyon et al. 1998).

Keywords

Internal Tide Cold Water Coral Carbonate Mound Sidescan Sonar Mobile Sand 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. M. Akhmetzhanov
    • 1
  • N. H. Kenyon
    • 1
  • M. K. Ivanov
    • 2
  • A. J. Wheeler
    • 3
  • P. V. Shashkin
    • 2
  • T. C. E. van Weering
    • 4
  1. 1.Empress DockSouthampton Oceanography CentreSouthamptonUK
  2. 2.Coastal Resources Centre, UNESCO-MSU Centre for Marine Geosciences, Faculty of GeologyMoscow State University, Vorobjevy GoryMoscowRussia
  3. 3.Old Presentation BuildingUniversity CollegeCorkIreland
  4. 4.The Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ)TexelThe Netherlands

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