Allogeneic Cell Therapy with Antigen-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes (CTL) for Malignant Melanoma

  • A. Nolte
  • J. Slotty
  • C. Beike
  • W. E. Berdel
  • J. Kienast
Conference paper

Abstract

Melanoma cells express numerous melanoma-associated antigens (MAA) which are recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in an HLA-restricted manner [1-7]. However, in most patients a tumor-specific immune response seems to be hampered by tolerance induction. In principal, tumor tolerance should be overcome by transplantation of an HLA-identical immune system followed by transfer of melanoma-specific CTL of the donor. We therefore evaluated strategies for adoptive immunotherapy with allogeneic, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) matched CTL specific for MAA. Several peptide epitopes derived from MAA with known HLA-A*0201-restriction were investigated for their ability to reproducibly induce a melanoma-specific CTL response.

Keywords

Chromium Cytosol Hunt Noma Mosse 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Nolte
    • 1
  • J. Slotty
    • 1
  • C. Beike
    • 1
  • W. E. Berdel
    • 1
  • J. Kienast
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Internal Medicine — Hematology/OncologyUniversity of MuensterGermany

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