Applications of Kansei Engineering to Personalization

Practical ways to include consumer expectations into personalization and customization concepts
  • Rosa Porcar
  • María-José Such
  • Enrique Alcántara
  • Ana-Cruz García
  • Alvaro Page

Abstract

This chapter proposes two practical ways to include user preferences in a personalization system aimed at psychological perception and based on a Kansei system. In many mass customization systems the consumer as an inexperienced designer can get lost and will become frustrated about the huge amount of offered possibilities. We will discuss how Kansei engineering can be used to guide customers in order to quickly find the desired design according to their preferences. Secondly, the number of possible design options and combinations in a modular personalization system can be higher than stocking, logistic and manufacturing capabilities. Focusing production variability on features affecting most users’ preferences and purchase decisions may reduce this amount of design options. We will use case studies form the office furniture and footwear industry to support these ideas.

Keywords

Marketing Coherence 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. [1]
    Rosenblad-Wallin, E.: User-oriented product development applied to functional clothing desing, in: Applied Ergonomics, 16 (1985), pp.279–287.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. [2]
    Nagamachi, M.: Kansei engineering: a new ergonomic consumer-oriented technology for product development, in: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, 15 (1985), pp. 3–11.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. [3]
    Matsubara, Y.; Nagamachi, M.: Hybrid Kansei engineering system and design support, International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, 19 (1997), pp. 81–92.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. [4]
    Osgood, C.; Suci, G.; Tannembaum, P.: The measurement of meaning, 1957.Google Scholar
  5. [5]
    Faulkner, T.; Caplan, S.: The role of human factor specialists in the development of consumer/commercial products, in: 4th Symposium of Human Factors and Industrial Design in Consumer Products, St. Paul 1985.Google Scholar
  6. [6]
    Porcar, R: Application of multivariate analysis to obtaining design criteria for office furniture, Politechnical University of Valencia, 1999.Google Scholar
  7. [6]
    Hayashi, C.: Method of quantification, in: Toyokeizai, Tokyo 1976.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rosa Porcar
    • 1
  • María-José Such
    • 1
  • Enrique Alcántara
    • 1
  • Ana-Cruz García
    • 1
  • Alvaro Page
    • 1
  1. 1.Biomechanics Institute of Valencia (IBV)ValeniciaSpain

Personalised recommendations