Advertisement

On the Design of a Robotic System Composed of an Unmanned Surface Vehicle and a Piggybacked VTOL

  • Eduardo Pinto
  • Pedro Santana
  • Francisco Marques
  • Ricardo Mendonça
  • André Lourenço
  • José Barata
Part of the IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology book series (IFIPAICT, volume 423)

Abstract

This paper presents the core ideas of the RIVERWATCH experiment and describes its hardware architecture. The RIVERWATCH experiment considers the use of autonomous surface vehicles piggybacking multi-rotor unmanned aerial vehicles for the automatic monitoring of riverine environments. While the surface vehicle benefits from the aerial vehicle to extend its field of view, the aerial vehicle benefits from the surface vehicle to ensure long-range mobility. This symbiotic relation between both robots is expected to enhance the robustness and long lasting of the ensemble. The hardware architecture includes a considerable set of state-of-the-art sensory modalities and it is abstracted from the perception and navigation algorithms by using the Robotics Operating System (ROS). A set of field trials shows the ability of the prototype to scan a closed water body. The datasets obtained from the field trials are freely available to the robotics community.

Keywords

cooperative robots unmanned aerial vehicles UAV autonomous surface vehicles ASV environmental monitoring riverine environments 

References

  1. 1.
    Hawbecker, P., Box, J.E., Balog, J.D., Ahn, Y., Benson, R.J.: Greenland outlet glacier dynamics from Extreme Ice Survey (EIS) photogrammery, American Geophysical Union, San Francisco (2010)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Church, J.A., White, N.J.: A 20th century acceleration in global sea level rise. Geographic Research Letters 33(1) (2006)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Allison, I., et al: The Copenhagen Diagnosis - Updating the World on the Latest Climate Science. The University of New South Wales Climate Change Research Centre (CCRC), Elsevier, Sydney (2011) Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Sukhatme, G.S., Dhariwal, A., Zhang, B., Oberg, C., Stauffer, B., Caron, D.A.: Design and development of a wireless robotic networked aquatic microbial observing system. Environmental Engineering Science 24(2), 205–215 (2007)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Bhadauria, D.I. (s.d.): A Robotic Sensor Network for monitoring carp in Minnesota lakes. In: IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), pp. 3837–3842. IEEE Press, Anchorage (2010)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Tokekar, P., Bhadauria, D., Studenski, A., Isler, V.: A robotic system for monitoring carp in Minnesota lakes. Journal of Field Robotics 27(6), 779–789 (2010)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Murphy, R.R., Steimle, E., Griffin, C., Cullins, C., Hall, M., Pratt, K.: Cooperative use of unmanned sea surface and micro aerial vehicles at Hurricane Wilma. Journal of Field Robotics 25(3), 164–180 (2008)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Heidarsson, H.K., Sukhatme, G.: Obstacle detection from overhead imagery using self-supervised learning for autonomous surface vehicles. In: 2011 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), pp. 3160–3165. IEEE (2011)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eduardo Pinto
    • 1
    • 2
  • Pedro Santana
    • 3
    • 4
  • Francisco Marques
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ricardo Mendonça
    • 1
    • 2
  • André Lourenço
    • 1
    • 2
  • José Barata
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Departamento de Engenharia ElectrotécnicaUniversidade Nova de LisboaPortugal
  2. 2.Instituto de Desenvolvimento de Novas Tecnologias, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Edificio UninovaUninovaPortugal
  3. 3.Departamento de Ciências e Tecnologias da InformaçãoInstituto Universitário de Lisboa (ISCTE-IUL)LisboaPortugal
  4. 4.Instituto de TelecomunicaçõesLisboaPortugal

Personalised recommendations