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Capturing Performative Actions for Interaction and Social Awareness

  • Julie R. Williamson
  • Stephen Brewster
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8045)

Abstract

Capturing and making use of observable actions and behaviours presents compelling opportunities for allowing end-users to interact with such data and eachother. For example, simple visualisations based on on detected behaviour or context allow users to interpret this data based on their existing knowledge and awarness of social cues. This paper presents one such “remote awareness” application where users can interpret a visualization based on simple behaviours to gain a sense of awareness of other users’ current context or actions. Using a prop embedded with sensors, users could control the visualisation using gesture and voice-based input. The results of this work describe the kinds of performances users generated during the trial, how they imagined the actions of their fellow participants based on the visualisation, and how the props containing sensors were used to support, or in some cases hinder, successful performance and interaction.

Keywords

Social Awareness Sensor Pack Gait Phase Mobile Context Performative Action 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julie R. Williamson
    • 1
  • Stephen Brewster
    • 1
  1. 1.University of GlasgowGlasgowUK

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