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Plant Development in Mediterranean Climates

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Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD,volume 8)

Abstract

The summer dry, winter wet climates (Mediterranean) of the world are located in five disjunct areas which generally lie on the west sides of continents between latitudes of 30° to 40° (Fig. 1). All of these areas have vegetations dominated by evergreen sclerophyllous shrubs and trees, and with annuals and herbaceous perennials as additional important vegetation components (Specht, 1969; Mooney and Dunn, 1970; di Castri and Mooney, 1973).

Keywords

  • Mediterranean climate
  • chaparral
  • California
  • Chile
  • sclerophyll
  • drought
  • shrub
  • phenolics
  • predation
  • phenology
  • resource division
  • carbon balance
  • carbon apportionment

Contribution supported by NSF Grant GB 27151

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Mooney, H.A., Parsons, D.J., Kummerow, J. (1974). Plant Development in Mediterranean Climates. In: Lieth, H. (eds) Phenology and Seasonality Modeling. Ecological Studies, vol 8. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-51863-8_22

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-51863-8_22

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