Education in Medical Informatics in the Undergraduate Medical Curriculum: A Review

  • Ray Jones
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Medical Informatics book series (LNMED, volume 40)

Abstract

In the UK, ‘over #100 million a year .... Is being spent on information technology in the NHS, and it is evident that not enough is being done to train .... personnel to take full advantage of the developing systems and the information they can produce’[1]. A survey of heads of clinical divisions in Scotland showed that lack of experience in informatics was one of the main reasons for the slow progress in clinical computing [2]. In the theme of this conference, education in medical informatics (Ml) should indeed add value to the health of the UK.

Keywords

Europe Dyspepsia Mumps 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ray Jones
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Community MedicineUniversity of GlasgowGlasgowScotland

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