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Chromosomal Aberrations

  • Cornelis J. P. Thijn
Chapter

Abstract

After mongolism, trisomy 18 is the second most common syndrome of multiple abnormalities [1]. It is usually caused by a full trisomy of the number 18 chromosome. A large variety of abnormalities may be found [1–3].

Keywords

Gonadal Dysgenesis Skeletal Maturation Middle Phalanx Acetabular Roof Arthrogryposis Multiplex Congenita 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cornelis J. P. Thijn
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyState University HospitalGroningenNetherlands

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