Advertisement

Transition Metal Ions in the Gas Phase

  • Douglas P. Ridge
Part of the Lecture Notes in Chemistry book series (LNC, volume 31)

Abstract

For several years we have been studying the chemistry of atomic transition metal ions with simple organic molecules. This research was stimulated by our interest in examining the consequences of oxidation and reduction of transition metals in their gas phase ion molecule chemistry. This is an area of chemistry, redox chemistry, which has received little attention from those of us interested in gas phase chemical dynamics. An initial discovery in our investigations was that atomic transition metal ions are quite subject to oxidative addition; a concerted process in which XY adds to M so that the metal is inserted into the XY bond to form XMY. As Pearson notes [1], it has only been in the last 15 years that oxidative addition has been recognized as an important elementary reaction. In fact our results appear to be the first direct observation of oxidative addition to transition metals in the gas phase. We have been particularly interested in oxidative addition processes that involve formation of metal carbon bonds. We have obtained evidence that such processes occur in alkyl halides and alcohols [2–4], in halobenzenes [5] and in alkanes [6,7].

Keywords

Oxidative Addition Cyclic Ketone Carbonyl Functionality Alkane Reaction Simple Organic Molecule 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    R.G. Pearson, Symmetry Rules for Chemical Reactions, Wiley, New York 1976, p. 280.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    J. Allison and D.P. Ridge, J. Organomet. Chem., 99 (1975) C11.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    J. Allison and D.P. Ridge, J. Amer. Chem. Soc., 98 (1976) 7445.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    J. Allison and D.P. Ridge, J. Amer. Chem. Soc., 101 (1979) 4998.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    T.G. Dietz, D.S. Chatellier and D.P. Ridge, J. Amer. Chem. Soc., 100 (1978) 4905.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    J. Allison, R.B. Freas and D.P. Ridge, J. Amer. Chem. Soc., 101 (1979) 1332.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    R.B. Freas and D.P. Ridge, J. Amer. Chem. Soc., 102 (1980) 7129.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    M.S. Foster and J.L. Beauchamp, J. Amer. Chem. Soc., 97 (1975) 4808.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    P.B. Armentrout and J.L. Beauchamp, J. Amer. Chem. Soc., 103 (1981) 784.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    The energy required for the reaction CH4 → CH2 + H2 is 112 kcal/mole (H.M. Rosenstock, K. Draxl, B.W. Steiner and J.T. Herron, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data, 6, Supplement No. 1 (1977)), far in excess of D(Cr+-CH2)= 65 ± 6 kcal/mole (L.F. Halle, P.B. Armentrout and J.L. Beauchamp, private communication).Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    a) J. Allison, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Delaware, 1978;Google Scholar
  12. 11.
    b) R.B. Freas, J. Wronka and D.P. Ridge, to be submitted for publication.Google Scholar
  13. 12.
    A. Kant, S.-S. Lin and B. Strauss, J. Chem. Phys., 49 (1968) 1983.Google Scholar
  14. 13.
    A. Kant and B. Strauss, J. Chem. Phys., 41 (1964) 3806.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 14.
    P.H. Barrett, M. Pasternak and R.G. Pearson, J. Amer. Chem. Soc., 101 (1979) 222.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 15.
    Stephen C. Davis and K.J. Klabunde, J. Amer. Chem. Soc., 102 (1980) 1736.Google Scholar
  17. 16.
    R. Noyori, Accts. Chem. Res., 12 (1979) 61.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Douglas P. Ridge
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryUniversity of DelawareNewarkUSA

Personalised recommendations