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Some Conclusions from the Port Hacking Estuary Project

  • Matthias TomczakJr.
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes on Coastal and Estuarine Studies book series (COASTAL, volume 3)

Summary

The Port Hacking experiment, an interdisciplinary five year study of an east Australian estuary guided by a model of carbon flow, is reviewed as an application of systems analysis to marine ecology. It is argued that the experiment was of the basic research type, irrespective of statements by participants at the start of the project. It is observed that the numerical model suffered from insufficient input data, a situation which is shown to be common with models of the basic research type. A discussion of some general characteristic features of research programs with strong mathematical input leads to a recommendation to weaken the link between numerical model and field program and let both disciplines develop along their own lines, with weak interaction through a joint project.

Key words

ecosystems mathematical analysis field programs planning Port Hacking South West Arm 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthias TomczakJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of OceanographyCSIRO Marine LaboratoriesCronullaAustralia

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