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Social Business: Defining and Situating the Concept

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Social Business

Abstract

This chapter defines the concept of social business, including Type I and Type II social businesses. By situating social business in a broader range of related ideas, we clarify its evolution and distinctiveness. The authors also raise questions about issues that surface in the creation and study of social business, including the question of selfish human nature; the need for social performance indicators; understanding of social and cultural contexts; and the political implications of social change. This first chapter also describes the format of the rest of the book.

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Grove, A., Berg, G.A. (2014). Social Business: Defining and Situating the Concept. In: Grove, A., Berg, G. (eds) Social Business. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-45275-8_1

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