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Multimedia Resources in Engineering Education

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Part of the Materials Forming, Machining and Tribology book series (MFMT)

Abstract

In this study, the impact of employing multimedia resources in the teaching of a common first year engineering course, Engineering Materials, was investigated. The aim was to determine if there was an improvement in students’ reported understanding and evidence of increased student engagement in the online discussion forums as a result of using the resources. Threshold concepts and the related notion of troublesome knowledge has resurfaced in research as well as in current thinking about learning and teaching in higher education. There is no clear indication in engineering education literature on how multimedia resources could influence student understanding of threshold and complex concepts. The multimedia resources used in the course were developed as part of a framework of resources intended to guide students through identified threshold concepts. Animation software was used, supplemented by video recordings and inked annotations of each lecture. An online survey was conducted over three semesters utilizing an inbuilt facility in the online learning environment. The initial results showed that implementing the multimedia resources significantly improved the student engagement in the online discussion forums? The perceived quality of teaching and students’ understanding of complex topics also improved as was revealed by results and students report. Seventy three per cent of the students stated their preference toward teaching methods using multimedia resources and inking. This preference was more pronounced in the off campus or online student cohort.

Keywords

  • Student Engagement
  • Binary Phase Diagram
  • Complex Concept
  • Engineering Student
  • High Order Thinking

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to B. F. Yousif .

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Yousif, B.F., Basson, M., Hobohm, C. (2014). Multimedia Resources in Engineering Education. In: Davim, J. (eds) Modern Mechanical Engineering. Materials Forming, Machining and Tribology. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-45176-8_15

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-45176-8_15

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