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Space Systems Engineering

  • Vincent L. Pisacane
Chapter
Part of the Springer Praxis Books book series (PRAXIS)

Abstract

A space system consists of a complex set of synergistically related components that together satisfy a coherent set of requirements derived from a set of needs. The objective of systems engineering is to design, develop, deploy, operate, and dispose of a system that meets the user’s needs, defined in terms of technical or performance specifications and constraints such as cost, schedule, and risk that constitute a set of system-level requirements.

Keywords

Configuration Management Risk Management Plan Functional Decomposition Fault Tree Analysis Development Life Cycle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Further Reading

  1. 19.
    Blanchard, B. S., and Fabrycky, W. J., “Systems Engineering and Analysis,” 4th Edition, Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, 2005.Google Scholar
  2. 20.
    Griffin, M. D., and French, J. R., “Space Vehicle Design,2nd Ed., AIAA Education Series, Reston, VA, 2004.Google Scholar
  3. 21.
    Kossiakoff, A., and Sweet, W. N., “Systems Engineering Principles and Practice,” John Wiley & Sons, New York, NY, 2003.Google Scholar
  4. 22.
    Larson, W., Kirkpatrick, D., Sellers J., Thomas, L., and Verma, D., “Applied Space Systems Engineering,” Space Technology Series, 2009.Google Scholar
  5. 23.
    Pisacane, V. L., “Fundamentals of Space Systems,” Oxford University Press, New York, N.Y., 2005.Google Scholar
  6. 24.
    Sage, A. P., (Ed.) “Systems Engineering,” John Wiley & Sons, New York, NY, 2010.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vincent L. Pisacane
    • 1
  1. 1.United States Naval AcademyAnnapolisUSA

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