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Designing Scalable Informal Learning Solutions with Personas: A Pilot Study in the Healthcare Sector

  • Stefan Thalmann
  • Vanessa Borntrager
  • Tamsin Treasure-Jones
  • John Sandars
  • Ronald Maier
  • Kathrin Widmann
  • Micky Kerr
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8095)

Abstract

Driven by ever shorter cycles of innovation, organizations and individuals nowadays have to acquire, understand and apply new knowledge in shorter periods of time [1]. Much of this rapid learning appears to be achieved by workers learning on the job and from colleagues – informal learning rather than learning from traditional, curriculum-based training [2]. Mobile technology could potentially provide support to this informal learning as it can provide scalable and flexible learning tools that can be used at any time across a variety of locations: at home, on different work sites, during travel [3]. However, designing learning technology that can support such unstructured, creative and expertise-driven informal learning is challenging, especially as there are likely to be great variations across employees in terms of their perceptions, experiences and expectations regarding technology [4]. These expectations and experiences may also differ from those of the developers and designers. Yet it is the match between user requirements and functionalities that lies at the heart of a successful learning technology. In Learning Layers we are exploring how creating and using Personas may help to design scalable technology for supporting informal learning in healthcare.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stefan Thalmann
    • 1
  • Vanessa Borntrager
    • 1
  • Tamsin Treasure-Jones
    • 2
  • John Sandars
    • 2
  • Ronald Maier
    • 1
  • Kathrin Widmann
    • 1
  • Micky Kerr
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Innsbruck School of ManagementInnsbruckAustria
  2. 2.Leeds Institute of Medical EducationUniversity of LeedsLeedsUK

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