Emerging Technologies and the Contextual and Contingent Experiences of Ageing Well

  • Toni Robertson
  • Jeannette Durick
  • Margot Brereton
  • Kate Vaisutis
  • Frank Vetere
  • Bjorn Nansen
  • Steve Howard
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-40477-1_37

Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8119)
Cite this paper as:
Robertson T. et al. (2013) Emerging Technologies and the Contextual and Contingent Experiences of Ageing Well. In: Kotzé P., Marsden G., Lindgaard G., Wesson J., Winckler M. (eds) Human-Computer Interaction – INTERACT 2013. INTERACT 2013. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 8119. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

Abstract

Based on a series of interviews of Australians between the ages of 55 and 75 this paper explores the relations between our participants’ attitudes towards and use of communication, social and tangible technologies and three relevant themes from our data: staying active, friends and families, and cultural selves. While common across our participants’ experiences of ageing, these themes were notable for the diverse ways they were experienced and expressed within individual lives and for the different roles technology was used for within each. A brief discussion of how the diversity of our ageing population implicates the design of emerging technologies ends the paper.

Keywords

Ageing population ageing well social technologies tangible technologies diversity 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toni Robertson
    • 1
  • Jeannette Durick
    • 1
  • Margot Brereton
    • 2
  • Kate Vaisutis
    • 2
  • Frank Vetere
    • 3
  • Bjorn Nansen
    • 3
  • Steve Howard
    • 3
  1. 1.Faculty of Engineering and Information TechnologyUniversity of TechnologySydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Science and Engineering FacultyQueensland University of TechnologyAustralia
  3. 3.Computing and Information SystemsThe University of MelbourneAustralia

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