Applying STIRPAT Model to Identify Driving Factors of Urban Residential Building Energy Consumption: A Case Study of Chongqing in China

Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 242)

Abstract

In this article population, urbanization, construction area and the level of urban consumption are selected as the key factors of driving the growth of urban residential building energy consumption. At the same time, STIRPAT model is adopted to research quantitatively on the influence of these factors. Ridge regression is adopted to set up the driving factors regression model of urban residential building energy consumption. According to the results of the regression analysis, it is concluded as follows that firstly, the level of urban consumption has much more influence on the growth of urban residential building energy consumption than other factors, secondly increase of urban construction area directly drives the growth of urban residential building energy consumption, and thirdly the structure of population has much more influence on the growth of urban residential building energy consumption.

Keywords

Building energy consumption Urban residential building STIRPAT model Driving factors Regression analysis 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Real Estate and Construction Management, Chongqing UniversityChongqingPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.School of Civil Engineering and ArchitectureChongqing University of Science and TechnologyChongqingPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Rinker School of Building ConstructionUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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