Insights from Eye Movement into Dynamic Decision-Making Research and Usability Testing

  • Benoit R. Vallières
  • Cindy Chamberland
  • François Vachon
  • Sébastien Tremblay
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 373)

Abstract

This study shows how the use of various measures of eye movement can serve to portray dynamic decision-making (DDM) in a coherent fashion. We extracted eye movement metrics relative to 1) scanpath, 2) eye fixations, and 3) pupillary response, to characterize DDM during the process of risk assessment. Results from Experiment 1 revealed that incorrect classifications were associated with 1) less efficient information search, 2) difficulties in making sense of critical information, and 3) a low level of cognitive load. In Experiment 2, we used eye tracking to assess the impact on DDM of introducing a decision support system. The addition of a temporal-overview display seems to affect processing time in DDM as indexed by shorter scanpaths and fixations during classifications. These findings illustrate how event-based eye movement measures can reveal characteristics and limitations of the ongoing cognitive processing involved in DDM and also contribute to usability testing.

Keywords

Eye movements dynamic decision-making usability testing decision support system 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benoit R. Vallières
    • 1
  • Cindy Chamberland
    • 1
  • François Vachon
    • 1
  • Sébastien Tremblay
    • 1
  1. 1.Co-DOT Laboratory, School of PsychologyUniversité LavalCanada

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