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Using Cognitive Work Analysis to Drive Usability Evaluations in Complex Systems

  • Aren Hunter
  • Tania Randall
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8019)

Abstract

This paper describes how Cognitive Work Analysis (CWA) can be utilized to support a system-level usability analysis. Overall, we suggest that CWA-derived work tasks should be considered as useful in guiding the development of scenario-based usability questions. We also suggest that usability practitioners be mindful of the importance of time consistencies in developing scenarios and in the appropriate timing of questions throughout the scenario. When evaluating the results of a system level usability experiment it is useful to view the results in light of cognitive and attentional biases.

Keywords

Attention Biases Cognitive Work Analysis Mental Models System Usability Work Tasks 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aren Hunter
    • 1
  • Tania Randall
    • 1
  1. 1.Defence R&D Canada – AtlanticDartmouthCanada

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