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RFID Mesh Network as an Infrastructure for Location Based Services for the Blind

  • Hugo Fernandes
  • Jose Faria
  • Paulo Martins
  • Hugo Paredes
  • João Barroso
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8008)

Abstract

People with visual impairments face serious challenges while moving from one place to another. This is a difficult challenge that involves obstacle avoidance, staying on street walks, finding doors, knowing the current location and keeping on track through the desired course, until the destination is reached. While assistive technology has contributed to the improvement of the quality of life of people with disabilities, people with visual impairment still face enormous limitations in terms of their mobility. There is still an enormous lack of availability of information that can be used to assist them, as well as a lack of sufficient precision in terms of the estimation of the user’s location. This paper proposes an infrastructure to assist the estimation of the user’s location with high precision using Radio Frequency Identification, providing seamless availability of location based services for the blind, whether indoor or outdoor.

Keywords

Computer-augmented environments blind navigation rfid 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hugo Fernandes
    • 1
  • Jose Faria
    • 2
  • Paulo Martins
    • 1
  • Hugo Paredes
    • 1
  • João Barroso
    • 1
  1. 1.INESC TEC (formerly INESC Porto)University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto DouroVila RealPortugal
  2. 2.University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto DouroVila RealPortugal

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